#FlintFriday | A little small talk between friends?

If you’re a Twitterer and ‘into’ archaeological lithics and flint, why not join the weekly #FlintFriday celebration of beautiful flint—as well as good fieldwork, recording, curation and sharing? Do you have a favourite in your local museum or archive?

This week’s latest from @microburin

Microtalk

Late Mesolithic narrow blade microliths from North Yorkshire archaeological excavation.

Spence

Please always ask permission to take photographs, and a scale is useful! Always report finds to the landowner (who remains the legal owner), the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS) and Historic Environment Record (HER) or seek advice | See useful contacts and links »

Remember | if an artefact isn’t accurately recorded, it’s lost its context and much of its meaning for everybody else.

Photography, Diplomacy and Grub | 1986 archaeology on a moor in Yorkshire

Dear Microburins.

Danby RiggI was flipping through some old (scanned) pictures from the prehistory of my archaeological past and thought you might enjoy these. It’s 1986 throw-back time, the second season investigating the Bronze Age upland landscape on Danby Rigg in the beautiful Esk valley on the North York Moors.

Aerial photography | On-site diplomacy | Sectioned lunch

The Bronze Age triple dykes subsequently radiocarbon dated to the Viking period, which was a surprise. The Durham University project included re-examination of a Bronze Age ring cairn with a large monolith, proving it to have at least one cremation burial.

Ring cairnThe landscape survey plotted the entire network of field systems and cairns hidden under the heather—certainly one of the most comprehensive surveys of its kind in north-east England, and executed before the advent of GPS or Total Station technology, but we did have an EDM. This was all dumpy level and back-sighting. I’m proud to be able to set up a theodolite in five seconds, while sleeping!

There is a tenuous Mesolithic connection in that, on the long walk up to the moor each morning, Microburin discovered a small Mesolithic assemblage at relatively low altitude. It included some blades and a scraper with edge gloss from processing plant materials, but no microliths. A large Mesolithic core was, inevitably, lying at the bottom of the deepest Viking ditch (residual). It’s a bit like the “token” sherd of Roman Samian Ware (posh dinner service crockery) found most other places, no matter what period you’re digging.

AF Harding Danby RiggHarding, A., Ostoja-Zagorski, J. 1994. Prehistoric and Early Medieval Activity on Danby Rigg, North Yorkshire, Archaeological Journal 151, 16-97.

The plans and sections are mostly mine, but some cheeky rascal got the credit.

Spence

Name three things you find in the Whitby Gazette | Mesolithic?

Sea-faring news | Adventure archaeology | The best fish & chips in the world

Image_Goldsborough_FieldwalkingDear microburins,

I’m teasing slightly, but glad to see archaeology in local news in North Yorkshire—and a new scoop-it mesolithic news item from the Whitby Gazette.

The North-East Yorkshire Mesolithic Project is completing its current funded phase in 2013 by looking at a ‘coastal’ site near Whitby where flints recovered from volunteer and professionally led field walking suggest activity from the Mesolithic through the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Nearby locations complete the story through to the Roman period (farms, villas and signal stations), IMGP1251Anglo-Saxons (royalty) right up to the present. It’s also a stunning location today, right above cliffs (near Runswick Bay) with views southwards towards Whitby, north over some of the highest sea cliffs in England, eastwards toward Denmark and The Netherlands over the dark North Sea (there since only around 6500 BC).

I’m chuffed I made it into the volunteer field-walking pic (I’m the one in the middle) and may be able to eat Whitby fish & chips off myself? More seriously, the Mesolithic in NE England is compelling—a nexus of chronological, social and territorial themes—and back to the end of the last glaciation (Late Devensian) over 13,000 years ago.
Read more | Summer 2012 adventures

Spence

Teesside Arch Soc | NewsFlash | Medieval North Yorkshire : Conferences and Courses 2013

  • Byland AbbeyNorthallerton and District Local History Society are hosting a taught 10 week series of evening courses covering The Medieval Towns of North Yorkshire from January 2013
  • The Yorkshire Archaeological Society Medieval Section are offering a one day conference on Recent Work on Yorkshire Monastic Landscapes and second day field trip to Wensleydale on Sat 6 and Sun 7 April 2013

Read more »

Teesside Archaeological Society | eNews | Oct 2012

TAS eNewsThe latest edition is out—packed with news and events!

  • Editorial Review | Autumn Programme | 2013 AGM | Time called on Time Team
  • Activities & Events | October Lecture : Prof Nicky Milner on the Star Carr Project | Tees Archaeology Day School | Regional Events
  • Site Notes | Crimdon Dene Latest | Bronze Age Wearside | Iron Age Chilton | Roman South Shields Community Archaeology
  • Members’ Voice | TAS Member Chris McLoughlin shares summer heritage travels
  • Browser | This month’s recommended Browsing, Listening and Reading items
  • About TAS | How to Join | eNews Archives

Remember | eNews is free—spread the word about TAS!

Love the rich, distinctive heritage of north-east England

Spence

 

Teesside Archaeological Society | eNews | Sep 2012

TAS eNewsThe latest edition is out—packed with news and events!

  • Tees Archaeology news & project updates
  • November Stockton buildings & history day school | York Archaeology 2012 conference
  • History of British Pottery exhibition opens at Hartlepool – including local finds from the Bronze Age to Medieval
  • Register interest for the new Ure-Swale Archaeology Forum (USAF) | visit the Bronze exhibition at the British Academy of Arts in London – a chance to see the Crosby Garrett Roman Parade Helmet (otherwise held in an anonymous private collection)
  • Loftus Excavation latest news – more Romans in over 5,000 years of north-east heritage – Neolithic mortuary structures, Bronze Age ritual monuments and settlements, an Iron Age village and salt working, now a Romano-British chieftain’s farm with jet working, Anglo-Saxon settlement, cemeteries and a Princess’s bed burial with jewels galore! | What next?

Love the rich, distinctive heritage of north-east England

Spence