Wild Things 2.0 Palaeolithic-Mesolithic Conference 2014 Abstracts | Lithoscapes posters

wild20Abstracts are now available, including two poster presentations from Lithoscapes Archaeological Research Foundation! That’s Paul Preston and me. There’s an exciting line-up of paper presentations with renowned national and international speakers. And a pub.

IMG_4469Unpicking the Palimpsest: A late Mesolithic upland activity area in North East England

Spencer Carter, Lithoscapes Archaeological Research Foundation | p30

This poster will outline the emerging results from on-going analyses of artefacts recorded during a systematic rescue excavation of a typologically Late Mesolithic upland lithic scatter at White Gill, Westerdale on the North York Moors, UK. The excavation and lithic assemblages are described and evaluated, including unequivocal evidence of hearth features with associated, discrete knapping events surrounding them, artefact associations with flat-stones, and a tentative structure. The early results of the lithics analysis are elucidated and reveal the complex lithic chaînes opératoires including the possible expedient use of legacy lithic material, and the possibility that one of the knappers was a juvenile or ‘apprentice learner’.

WGW2000-conjoining-microlithThe poster will also outline interesting evidence for site “pairing” suggested by lithic re-fits between neighbouring sites in the proximity of a palaeolake, the transport of raw materials, including the presence of finished Pennine chert tools. The project therefore affords a rare opportunity to analyse potential coeval activity and mobility over distance. Being the first comprehensive study of its kind in an area hitherto ignored or largely unrecorded, the micro-scale of the analyses described in this poster provides a keyhole view that not only confirms a rich data set, but also opens up new research questions that allow us to begin unpicking a persistent, palimpsestual, complex Mesolithic taskscape in a largely over-looked period and region. It also highlights implicit warnings about the damage that well-meaning or illicit “flinting” activities can wreak on a fragile archaeological record.

IMG_9690Everything We Know is Wrong? The MESOlithics Project: Charging lithics into the Mesolithic Canon

Paul Preston, Lithoscapes Archaeological Research Foundation | p42

Many researchers have set ambitious goals in attempting to create social narratives from Mesolithic lithic scatters in a landscape context or to derive socio-cultural/stylistic meaning from. While laudable, and recognising the rich debate that emanates from the research, such attempts have been arguably impeded by their reliance upon referential frameworks that fail to integrate adequately their theoretical base with systematic methodologies in support of their conclusions. As a result British Mesolithic studies — and concomitantly the so-called ‘Mesolithic Canon’ — have been hampered by the lack of three fundamental analytical foundations:

  1. a consensus definition of the Mesolithic, its phases and its geographic variation;
  2. an accurate, calibrated, sufficiently granular chronology, and;
  3. an explicitly defined, standardised, replicable lithic analysis methodology and typology.

KnapperThe most important of these is the third: it underpins the other two. However, this issue is especially acute since there are no agreed minimum standards for analysis and there remain a number of incompatible, unsystematic non-technological methodologies. It is therefore difficult to compare assemblages analysed by different lithicists, to derive reliable conclusions from past analyses and literature, and to communicate interpretations with universal clarity. Hence, interpretations tend to be subjective, result in para data rather than meta data, and are difficult to test in a replicable way.

As a consequence, this poster considers best practice in lithics analysis and how it can impact on current definitions of the British Mesolithic and its chronology. It then proposes a way to ameliorate many of the highlighted problems and outlines how a standardised technologically-based lithic methodology—with explicitly defined types, attributes and analytical protocols—can be developed and integrated with current theoretical paradigms.

About the conference

See you there!

Spence

TEESSCAPES Teesside Archaeological Society eNews | Autumn 2013

The latest edition is out—packed with news and events! Two options are available:

» Read as an online e-magazine | NEW! Gorgeous format using ISSUU e-publishing
» Download as a PDF file | save to your computer and read offline

  • TEESSCAPES Autumn 2013Society News | 2
  • TAS Lectures | 4
  • Special Feature | 7
    Skeletons in your cupboard?
  • Activities and Events | 10
  • News Roundup | 16
  • Site Notes | 22
  • Browser | 25
  • About TAS and how to join | 26

Remember | eNews is free – spread the word about TAS!

Uncover the hidden heritage of North East England

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TEESSCAPES Teesside Archaeological Society eNews | Summer 2013

The latest edition is out—packed with news and events! Available directly as a PDF download.

  • NAA Excavations at Greatham CreekEditorial Review | Professor Mick Aston in memoriam
  • TAS Lectures | After the summer break, the next lecture is Tue 24 September 7.30pm | How to get to Stockton Library
  • Special Feature | Northern Archaeological Associates report on surprising prehistoric and Roman finds at Greatham Creek in the Tees Estuary
  • Activities & Events | Archaeology Festivals | Fieldwork opportunities | Local and regional conferences, day schools, lectures and exhibitions
  • Site Notes | The latest regional projects and finds | Pipeline Update | Wear Stories
  • News Roundup | Stories and press coverage for our region
  • Browser | The latest recommended Browsing, Listening and Reading items
  • About TAS | Who we are | How to join | eNews Archive

Remember | eNews is free – spread the word about TAS!

Love the rich, distinctive heritage of North East England

Spence | Twitter @microburin

Lindisfarne Gospels come home | Community volunteering opportunity : Summer 2013

lindisfarne_lgHello microburins,

This is definitely not Mesolithic, but compelling nonetheless for anyone in North East England. The famous Lindisfarne Gospels are coming to the ancient city of Durham this summer. There are fantastic opportunities for community participation and volunteering for folks in North East England—to promote education and enjoyment of one of the World’s greatest books dating to the 7th century AD.

LindisfarmeGospelsCoverVolunteers are being sought to work with their local museum on Lindisfarne Gospels related activities to help celebrate the exhibition in Durham this summer.

From 1 July to 30 September this precious manuscript will go on show in a must-see exhibition in Durham University’s Palace Green Library. Please read this news release to find out how to get involved.

Love the rich, distinctive heritage of North East England

Spence

Holy Island | Durham University Archaeology fieldtrip 1985

Holy Island | Durham University Archaeology fieldtrip 1985